Hi, I'm Frank

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  digby 7 months ago.

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  • #10260

    digby
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    Hi everybody,

    I’m new to wood turning and have made the mistake of buying a small wood lathe. After a couple of months using it I have made some quite acceptable pieces that I am quite proud of. I wish however I had bought a much larger lathe as the one I have is quite limited to he size of wood that can be turned.

    I have just invested in a set of Robert Sorby chisels which are great but I now need a good sharpener I have been looking at the pro edge but it is rather expensive.

    I’m now in a quandary as to what to do next. I have found a 5 day wood turning course I wood like to go on but if I did I know I would not be satisfied with my little lathe and want a larger one and a lot more tools. I probably could afford this but keep saying to myself do I really want to spend all this money to produce dozens of pots and bowls.

    I am enjoying wood turning as a hobby but don’t want to turn it into a business so what would I do with them?

  • #10261
    Dunc
    Dunc
    Keymaster
    • Skype Name:

    Hi Frank, welcome to the Oliver’s Woodturning forum.

    There are a number of items you could produce with a smaller lathe. Pens are popular. You could create salt and pepper shakers. Maybe some clocks.

    Have a look around and see what other people have made and see if they give you any inspiration.

    The Pro Edge is a great machine by the way, ask anyone who uses one. Yes, they cost more than a bench grinder but they are set up to give perfect grinds every time.

    • #10271

      digby
      Participant
      • Skype Name:

      Hi Dunc, I have made quite a few different items, egg cups trinket boxes honey dribblers and loades more and have gradually got better especially after buying from Oliver’s, wood finish, Yorkshire Grit and sanding paper, my latest works look quite professional.

      I’ve just got to make a decision. I have watched YouTube videos of wood turners and would love to get to their standard. It’s really a question of cost in order to move on to the next stage. I’m proud to say I am a true Yorkshire man my wife says yes with deep pockets and short arms, even when buying for myself.

    • #10272
      Dunc
      Dunc
      Keymaster
      • Skype Name:

      Well, the decision is yours to make. Maybe its not a good idea to invest too much if you are not sure if it will be worth it in the end though you will find that more options and greater creativity will open up to you with more capable equipment.

      If its a hobby, treat it as such and don’t go crazy.

  • #10275

    Mike.Aoc
    Participant
    • Skype Name:

    Hi Frank

    40 years ago my wife bought me a B & D lathe, needless to say the B & D drill only lasted about a month and I replaced it with a couple of pillow block bearings and a washing machine motor, 6 months later I bought a used Arundle J4 followed by a Reconditioned Graduate bowl lathe then added a new Coronet CL3 which I converted to variable speed, sold both of these and bought a Jet 3520B then last year changed that for a FU230 from Simon Hope. This is the best lathe yet.

    Over this 40 year period woodturning has remained a hobby albeit now that I have retired it is a very serious 6 day a week hobby, without it I don’t know how I would spend my days. Five years ago I started renting some shelf space in a local shop simply to get rid of what I had turned, there is only so much you can flood the family with. The Jet and current lathe were in excess of £7000 both paid for from proceeds from the shop sales, I don’t take on commissions and only turn what I want, this way it remains a hobby.

    Regarding sharpening, I’ve had the lot over the years, white stones, Ruby stones, Sorby belt, etc. and 18 months ago I bought a 6″ CBN wheel fitted to a small grinder with a Tormek BGM kit I had, best thing yet, last month with shop proceeds I bought an 8″ slow speed grinder, two 8″ CBN wheels and a second Tormek BGM kit, great bit of kit.

    Add to all the turning tools, deep hollowing jigs, coring tools, air brushes, high speed carving tools, pyrography tools I dread to add up what I have spent, but in the main it is a hobby which pays for it’s self, but I make a point that if I am not 100% happy with an item it does not go up for sale.

    I think you are either going to have to get arm stretching exercises or get shallower pockets, 30 years ago I was one of the founder members of the AWGB and have been a club member ever since and still learning. Joining a local club may be cheaper than a 5 day course and inevitably some one in the club will give you some help and guidance not only with turning but what the pros and cons are of all that lovely equipment.

    I hope it works out for you, happy Christmas.

  • #10307

    Frederick Mitchell
    Participant
    • Skype Name:

    Hi Frank! I’d recommend getting a small bench grinder (the Axminster hobby series is what I use) and a jig From eBay (eBay item number:222535647760) as for turning larger things I’m afraid I’m in the same boat so can’t help. To get rid of bowls I’d recommend getting onto local craft sales Facebook pages and advertising there.

    All the best

    Fred.

  • #10308

    digby
    Participant
    • Skype Name:

    Thank you all for your feedback

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