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    • #21802
      karl
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      hi all could you answer some questions for me what is the difference between a bowl rouging gouge and a spindle roughing gouge, can you turn bowls with a spindle gouge and vice versa can you turn spindles with a bowl gouge, would appriciate any advice, regards Karl.

    • #22066
      Dr Glenn f Cornish
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      <p style=”text-align: left;”>Hi, good question.</p>
       

      Terminology first, not really any specific tool as a ‘bowl roughing gouge’ (unless you count carbide tools, another topic….).

      A spindle roughing gouge is definitely a thing. That is made from flat stock, then bent into an arc or curve. It has a ‘tang’ that is a thinner bit going into the handle.

    • #22068
      Dr Glenn f Cornish
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      <p style=”text-align: left;”>It is ground flat along the front, so there is no ‘point’. This means that if you try to use it on the inside of a bowl, the edges WILL catch. It is also not strong enough to take the forces involved in hollowing a bowl, because of the tang, so must not be used on a bowl.</p>

    • #22078
      Dr Glenn f Cornish
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      So that’s the spindle roughing gouge.

      There is some similarities between bowl gouges (bg) and spindle gouges (sg).

      In general, sg have less metal in them. They are sometimes made from round stock, sometimes flat then curved into shape. But the flute, the hollow centre, is always shallower than a bg.

      This makes the bg much stronger, the shaft also always goes full thickness into the handle, giving it even greater strength.

      In theory, an expert could follow a bowl with a sg. Because they know hot present the tool so as not to get catches, and can take very delicate cuts. It would take them a long time though. For you and me, it’s a recipe for trouble. You can use a sg on the rim of a bowl or platter for detail, otherwise a bg every time. I use a moderate fingernail grind at 45 degrees, as I like having the option the swept back wings to shear scrapethere is a great deal spoken about different types of grinds. And if you’re turning all day every day, then yes, I’m sure it makes a difference. And different grinds are useful for different tasks. My opinion, fwiw, is that as long as you have a sharp tool, and keep sharpening it, then you will do OK.

       

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